Uterine Cancer

Uterine cancer is cancer that starts in the uterus. The uterus is a female reproductive organ, also called the womb, where a baby develops during pregnancy. One of the most common types of uterine cancer is endometrial cancer, which is cancer in the lining of uterus. Uterine sarcoma is another, rarer, type of uterine cancer. 

Uterine cancer can often be treated effectively when it is discovered early. It is important to talk to your doctor if you have any unusual vaginal discharge or bleeding, or pain in your pelvis.

Treatment

Your treatment plan will depend on the type of uterine cancer you have, how far it has spread and your personal and family medical history. Treatments may include surgery, chemotherapy, radiation or hormone therapy.

Surgery is often used to treat uterine cancer. At Penn State Cancer Institute, our urologic team includes three fellowship-trained surgeons. They have extensive surgical experience for all urological cancers, including uterine cancer. Our highly skilled team delivers the latest advances in care: 

  • Minimally invasive surgical procedures (robotic surgery)
  • Standard, open surgery
  • Salvage surgeries following radiation
  • Surgery to address locally advanced cancer

Care Team

You may see one or more of the following specialists for your cancer treatment.
Leah Cream, MD Leah Cream, MD Medical Oncologist View Researcher Profile
Jennifer Rosenberg, MD Jennifer Rosenberg, MD Radiation Oncologist View Researcher Profile
Marc Rovito, MD Marc Rovito, MD Hematology/Oncologist View Researcher Profile
Leonard Tuanquin, MD Leonard Tuanquin, MD Radiation Oncologist View Researcher Profile
Joshua Kesterson, MD Joshua Kesterson, MD View Researcher Profile
Rebecca Phaeton, MD Rebecca Phaeton, MD View Researcher Profile

Locations

We provide specialized care for urologic oncology patients of central Pennsylvania in a setting that is easily accessible for both patients and referring providers.
Penn State Health Medical Group - Nyes Road Specialties

Penn State Health Medical Group - Nyes Road Specialties

121 N Nyes Rd
Suite C
Harrisburg, PA 17112

Phone: 717-657-4045
Penn State Health Surgery Specialties

Penn State Health Surgery Specialties

200 Campus
Suite 3100
Hershey, PA 17033

Phone: 717-531-8887

Clinical Trials

Groups, Classes and Support

Support groups offer an opportunity to connect with other patients, caregivers and families. Learn more about support groups offered at Penn State Cancer Institute.

Prevention and Screening

Uterine cancer can’t be prevented, but there are certain factors that may put you at higher risk for developing uterine cancer. Those risk factors include:

  • Being over the age of 50
  • Obesity
  • Taking estrogen without progesterone during menopause
  • Past difficulty getting pregnant
  • Taking tamoxifen
  • Family history of uterine, colon or ovarian cancer
  • Exposure to X-rays, including radiation for past cancer

Screening

There are no screenings for uterine cancer. However, you should schedule a physical that includes a pelvic exam every year. This annual appointment gives you the opportunity to regularly check in with your doctor, and gives your provider the chance to identify any potential issues with a complete and comprehensive exam.

Symptoms and Diagnosis

Uterine cancer is cancer that starts in the uterus. The uterus is a female reproductive organ, also called the womb, where a baby develops during pregnancy.

Symptoms

The most common symptoms of uterine cancer are unusual bleeding and discharge. Symptoms of uterine sarcoma may also include: 

  • Frequent urination
  • A mass in the vagina
  • Pain in your belly or pelvis
  • Frequent urination

If you experience any of these symptoms, or have other concerns, schedule an appointment with your doctor immediately.

Diagnosis

Your provider will give you a complete exam find out what’s causing your symptoms. The appointment will include a pelvic exam so your doctor can check for any abnormalities. 

Additional tests may also be ordered, including a transvaginal ultrasound and possibly a biopsy. 

The ultrasound will help your doctor see any unusual growths or areas in your uterus. If there are suspicious spots on the ultrasound, then you may need a biopsy. 

During the biopsy, a small sample of cells will be collected and then tested for cancer. Your doctor will use this information to create a treatment plan that is right for you. 

Uterine Cancer

Uterine cancer is cancer that starts in the uterus. The uterus is a female reproductive organ, also called the womb, where a baby develops during pregnancy. One of the most common types of uterine cancer is endometrial cancer, which is cancer in the lining of uterus. Uterine sarcoma is another, rarer, type of uterine cancer. 

Uterine cancer can often be treated effectively when it is discovered early. It is important to talk to your doctor if you have any unusual vaginal discharge or bleeding, or pain in your pelvis.

Your treatment plan will depend on the type of uterine cancer you have, how far it has spread and your personal and family medical history. Treatments may include surgery, chemotherapy, radiation or hormone therapy.

Surgery is often used to treat uterine cancer. At Penn State Cancer Institute, our urologic team includes three fellowship-trained surgeons. They have extensive surgical experience for all urological cancers, including uterine cancer. Our highly skilled team delivers the latest advances in care: 

  • Minimally invasive surgical procedures (robotic surgery)
  • Standard, open surgery
  • Salvage surgeries following radiation
  • Surgery to address locally advanced cancer
You may see one or more of the following specialists for your cancer treatment.
Leah Cream, MD Leah Cream, MD Medical Oncologist View Researcher Profile
Jennifer Rosenberg, MD Jennifer Rosenberg, MD Radiation Oncologist View Researcher Profile
Marc Rovito, MD Marc Rovito, MD Hematology/Oncologist View Researcher Profile
Leonard Tuanquin, MD Leonard Tuanquin, MD Radiation Oncologist View Researcher Profile
Joshua Kesterson, MD Joshua Kesterson, MD View Researcher Profile
Rebecca Phaeton, MD Rebecca Phaeton, MD View Researcher Profile
We provide specialized care for urologic oncology patients of central Pennsylvania in a setting that is easily accessible for both patients and referring providers.
Penn State Health Medical Group - Nyes Road Specialties

Penn State Health Medical Group - Nyes Road Specialties

121 N Nyes Rd
Suite C
Harrisburg, PA 17112

Phone: 717-657-4045
Penn State Health Surgery Specialties

Penn State Health Surgery Specialties

200 Campus
Suite 3100
Hershey, PA 17033

Phone: 717-531-8887
Support groups offer an opportunity to connect with other patients, caregivers and families. Learn more about support groups offered at Penn State Cancer Institute.

Uterine cancer can’t be prevented, but there are certain factors that may put you at higher risk for developing uterine cancer. Those risk factors include:

  • Being over the age of 50
  • Obesity
  • Taking estrogen without progesterone during menopause
  • Past difficulty getting pregnant
  • Taking tamoxifen
  • Family history of uterine, colon or ovarian cancer
  • Exposure to X-rays, including radiation for past cancer

Screening

There are no screenings for uterine cancer. However, you should schedule a physical that includes a pelvic exam every year. This annual appointment gives you the opportunity to regularly check in with your doctor, and gives your provider the chance to identify any potential issues with a complete and comprehensive exam.

Uterine cancer is cancer that starts in the uterus. The uterus is a female reproductive organ, also called the womb, where a baby develops during pregnancy.

Symptoms

The most common symptoms of uterine cancer are unusual bleeding and discharge. Symptoms of uterine sarcoma may also include: 

  • Frequent urination
  • A mass in the vagina
  • Pain in your belly or pelvis
  • Frequent urination

If you experience any of these symptoms, or have other concerns, schedule an appointment with your doctor immediately.

Diagnosis

Your provider will give you a complete exam find out what’s causing your symptoms. The appointment will include a pelvic exam so your doctor can check for any abnormalities. 

Additional tests may also be ordered, including a transvaginal ultrasound and possibly a biopsy. 

The ultrasound will help your doctor see any unusual growths or areas in your uterus. If there are suspicious spots on the ultrasound, then you may need a biopsy. 

During the biopsy, a small sample of cells will be collected and then tested for cancer. Your doctor will use this information to create a treatment plan that is right for you.