Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

Non-Hodgkin lymphoma - also called non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma - is a cancer of the lymph nodes, glands that help the body fight infection. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma is typically seen in adults 65 and older. It is more common than Hodgkin lymphoma. 

There are about 50,000 cases of non-Hodgkin lymphoma every year in the United States compared with 8,000 cases of Hodgkin lymphoma.

Treatment

A combination of chemotherapy and radiation or antibody therapy are typically used to treat non-Hodgkin lymphoma. To reduce side effects, patients are given the smallest doses necessary to achieve results.

The type of treatment depends on whether the disease has spread to lymph nodes throughout the body or is growing in only one location. 

If the disease comes back after treatment, a stem cell transplant may be the best option.

Our team of specialists at Penn State Cancer Institute will discuss standard and experimental options with you and your family.

Care Team

You may see one or more of the following specialists for your cancer treatment.
David Claxton, MD David Claxton, MD Malignant Hematologist View Researcher Profile
W. Christopher Ehmann, MD W. Christopher Ehmann, MD Malignant Hematologist View Researcher Profile
Raymond Hohl, MD, PhD Raymond Hohl, MD, PhD Malignant Hematologist View Researcher Profile
Heath Mackley, MD Heath Mackley, MD Radiation Oncologist View Researcher Profile
Seema Naik, MD Seema Naik, MD Malignant Hematologist View Researcher Profile
Witold Rybka, MD, FRCPC Witold Rybka, MD, FRCPC Malignant Hematologist View Researcher Profile
Henry Wagner Jr., MD Henry Wagner Jr., MD Radiation Oncologist View Researcher Profile
Hong Zheng, MD, PhD Hong Zheng, MD, PhD Malignant Hematologist View Researcher Profile
Shin Mineishi, MD Shin Mineishi, MD View Researcher Profile
Kevin L. Rakszawski, MD Kevin L. Rakszawski, MD View Researcher Profile

Locations

Penn State Cancer Institute

Penn State Cancer Institute

400 University Dr
Hershey, PA 17033

Phone: 717-531-6585

Clinical Trials

A Phase III Randomized, Open Label, Multi-center Study of the Safety and Efficacy of Apixaban for Thromboembolism Prevention versus No Systemic Anticoagulant Prophylaxis during Induction Chemotherapy in Children with Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) or Lymphoma (T or B cell) Treated with Pegylated Asparaginase
Risk-based, response-adapted, Phase II open-label trial of nivolumab + brentuximab vedotin (N + Bv) for children, adolescents, and young adults with relapsed/refractory (R/R) CD30 + classic Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) after failure of first-line therapy, followed by brentuximab + bendamustine (Bv + B) for participants with a suboptimal response. CheckMate 744: CHECKpoint pathway and nivolumab clinical Trial Evaluation

Groups, Classes and Support

Support groups offer an opportunity to connect with other patients, caregivers and families. Learn more about support groups offered at Penn State Cancer Institute.

Prevention and Screening

We don’t know the exact cause of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. As we age, our immune systems gradually decline, and poor immunity can lead to the development of non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Certain medications that affect the immune system and exposure to toxic chemicals can also increase the risk of developing this disease. 

The best screening for non-Hodgkin lymphomas is done by patients. If you notice an enlarged lymph node (gland), call your physician.

Symptoms and Diagnosis

Non-Hodgkin lymphoma - also called non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma - is a cancer of the lymph nodes, glands that help the body fight infection.

Symptoms

Symptoms of non-Hodgkin lymphoma include:

  • Painless swollen lymph nodes (glands) in the neck, armpit, groin or under the chin 
  • Fevers
  • Drenching night sweats
  • Unexplained weight loss

A biopsy of the affected lymph nodes will determine if you have the disease. This is a minor procedure done by a surgeon that causes little discomfort or risk to the patient. The tissue is examined under a microscope and tested to determine which type of cells are growing abnormally.

Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

Non-Hodgkin lymphoma - also called non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma - is a cancer of the lymph nodes, glands that help the body fight infection. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma is typically seen in adults 65 and older. It is more common than Hodgkin lymphoma. 

There are about 50,000 cases of non-Hodgkin lymphoma every year in the United States compared with 8,000 cases of Hodgkin lymphoma.

A combination of chemotherapy and radiation or antibody therapy are typically used to treat non-Hodgkin lymphoma. To reduce side effects, patients are given the smallest doses necessary to achieve results.

The type of treatment depends on whether the disease has spread to lymph nodes throughout the body or is growing in only one location. 

If the disease comes back after treatment, a stem cell transplant may be the best option.

Our team of specialists at Penn State Cancer Institute will discuss standard and experimental options with you and your family.

You may see one or more of the following specialists for your cancer treatment.
David Claxton, MD David Claxton, MD Malignant Hematologist View Researcher Profile
W. Christopher Ehmann, MD W. Christopher Ehmann, MD Malignant Hematologist View Researcher Profile
Raymond Hohl, MD, PhD Raymond Hohl, MD, PhD Malignant Hematologist View Researcher Profile
Heath Mackley, MD Heath Mackley, MD Radiation Oncologist View Researcher Profile
Seema Naik, MD Seema Naik, MD Malignant Hematologist View Researcher Profile
Witold Rybka, MD, FRCPC Witold Rybka, MD, FRCPC Malignant Hematologist View Researcher Profile
Henry Wagner Jr., MD Henry Wagner Jr., MD Radiation Oncologist View Researcher Profile
Hong Zheng, MD, PhD Hong Zheng, MD, PhD Malignant Hematologist View Researcher Profile
Shin Mineishi, MD Shin Mineishi, MD View Researcher Profile
Kevin L. Rakszawski, MD Kevin L. Rakszawski, MD View Researcher Profile
Penn State Cancer Institute

Penn State Cancer Institute

400 University Dr
Hershey, PA 17033

Phone: 717-531-6585
A Phase III Randomized, Open Label, Multi-center Study of the Safety and Efficacy of Apixaban for Thromboembolism Prevention versus No Systemic Anticoagulant Prophylaxis during Induction Chemotherapy in Children with Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) or Lymphoma (T or B cell) Treated with Pegylated Asparaginase
Risk-based, response-adapted, Phase II open-label trial of nivolumab + brentuximab vedotin (N + Bv) for children, adolescents, and young adults with relapsed/refractory (R/R) CD30 + classic Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) after failure of first-line therapy, followed by brentuximab + bendamustine (Bv + B) for participants with a suboptimal response. CheckMate 744: CHECKpoint pathway and nivolumab clinical Trial Evaluation
Support groups offer an opportunity to connect with other patients, caregivers and families. Learn more about support groups offered at Penn State Cancer Institute.

We don’t know the exact cause of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. As we age, our immune systems gradually decline, and poor immunity can lead to the development of non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Certain medications that affect the immune system and exposure to toxic chemicals can also increase the risk of developing this disease. 

The best screening for non-Hodgkin lymphomas is done by patients. If you notice an enlarged lymph node (gland), call your physician.

Non-Hodgkin lymphoma - also called non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma - is a cancer of the lymph nodes, glands that help the body fight infection.

Symptoms

Symptoms of non-Hodgkin lymphoma include:

  • Painless swollen lymph nodes (glands) in the neck, armpit, groin or under the chin 
  • Fevers
  • Drenching night sweats
  • Unexplained weight loss

A biopsy of the affected lymph nodes will determine if you have the disease. This is a minor procedure done by a surgeon that causes little discomfort or risk to the patient. The tissue is examined under a microscope and tested to determine which type of cells are growing abnormally.