Endometrial Cancer

Endometrial cancer begins in the lining of the uterus. It is also called uterine cancer. Endometrial cancer is the most common reproductive cancer found in women. The American Cancer Society estimates that more than 61,000 new cases of endometrial cancer are diagnosed each year in the United States

It is more likely to affect post-menopausal women who are over age 60. Endometrial cancer is also slightly more common in white women. Fortunately, when endometrial cancer is found early, it can be more effectively treated.  

Treatment

Gynecologic Oncology at Penn State Cancer Institute provides comprehensive care for women with pelvic malignancies, including endometrial cancer. 

We are also a major site for the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH)-sponsored Gynecologic Oncology Group. This helps us deliver the latest advances in care. 

Our comprehensive services include:

  • Treating cancer, including vaginal, cervical, uterine, fallopian tube and ovarian cancers. Our expertise includes:
    • Chemotherapy
    • Investigational therapies
    • Collaborative treatment plans with local oncologists for chemotherapy, radiation and follow-up treatment
  • Evaluating and treating many gynecological conditions, including:
    • Vulva, vaginal or cervical dysplasia
    • Pelvic masses
    • Abnormal uterine bleeding
    • Endometrial hyperplasia
  • Gynecologic surgery, including medically compromised, or surgically challenging cases
  • Evaluating abnormal or difficult-to-read Pap results
  • Second opinions

Care Team

You may see one or more of the following specialists for your cancer treatment.
Leah Cream, MD Leah Cream, MD Medical Oncologist View Researcher Profile
Jennifer Rosenberg, MD Jennifer Rosenberg, MD Radiation Oncologist View Researcher Profile
Marc Rovito, MD Marc Rovito, MD Hematology/Oncologist View Researcher Profile
Leonard Tuanquin, MD Leonard Tuanquin, MD Radiation Oncologist View Researcher Profile
Joshua Kesterson, MD Joshua Kesterson, MD View Researcher Profile
Rebecca Phaeton, MD Rebecca Phaeton, MD View Researcher Profile

Locations

Penn State Cancer Institute

Penn State Cancer Institute

400 University Dr
Hershey, PA 17033

Phone: 717-531-6585

Clinical Trials

Groups, Classes and Support

Support groups offer an opportunity to connect with other patients, caregivers and families. Learn more about support groups offered at Penn State Cancer Institute.

Prevention and Screening

Endometrial cancer cannot be prevented. However, there are some things you can do to lower your risk of developing endometrial cancer, including:

  • Maintain a healthy weight.
  • Stay physically active.
  • Talk to your doctor about if hormone replacement therapy is right for you.
  • See a doctor if you have any unusual or concerning symptoms.

Screening

There is no screening test for endometrial cancer. You should, however, see your doctor for an annual physical. That appointment may also include a pelvic exam. This yearly appointment gives you the opportunity to discuss any questions you have, and gives your doctor the chance to identify any potential health issues.

Symptoms and Diagnosis

Endometrial cancer begins in the lining of the uterus.

Symptoms

Symptoms of endometrial cancer include:

  • Unusual vaginal bleeding or discharge
  • Pelvic or stomach pain
  • Weight loss

If you have any of these symptoms or any other concerns about your health, then you should schedule an appointment with your provider as soon as possible.

Diagnosis

During your appointment, your doctor will do a complete exam, including asking about your personal and family medical history. You will also have a physical and pelvic exam, which will help your doctor identify any unusual symptoms or signs that you may have endometrial cancer.

If your doctor finds anything unusual, you may be referred to a specialist for additional testing, including:

  • An ultrasound to get a clearer picture of your uterus and endometrial lining 
  • A biopsy to check for cancerous cells in endometrial lining

Test results from these exams will help your doctor create a treatment plan that is right for you and your specific cancer. 

Endometrial Cancer

Endometrial cancer begins in the lining of the uterus. It is also called uterine cancer. Endometrial cancer is the most common reproductive cancer found in women. The American Cancer Society estimates that more than 61,000 new cases of endometrial cancer are diagnosed each year in the United States

It is more likely to affect post-menopausal women who are over age 60. Endometrial cancer is also slightly more common in white women. Fortunately, when endometrial cancer is found early, it can be more effectively treated.  

Gynecologic Oncology at Penn State Cancer Institute provides comprehensive care for women with pelvic malignancies, including endometrial cancer. 

We are also a major site for the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH)-sponsored Gynecologic Oncology Group. This helps us deliver the latest advances in care. 

Our comprehensive services include:

  • Treating cancer, including vaginal, cervical, uterine, fallopian tube and ovarian cancers. Our expertise includes:
    • Chemotherapy
    • Investigational therapies
    • Collaborative treatment plans with local oncologists for chemotherapy, radiation and follow-up treatment
  • Evaluating and treating many gynecological conditions, including:
    • Vulva, vaginal or cervical dysplasia
    • Pelvic masses
    • Abnormal uterine bleeding
    • Endometrial hyperplasia
  • Gynecologic surgery, including medically compromised, or surgically challenging cases
  • Evaluating abnormal or difficult-to-read Pap results
  • Second opinions
You may see one or more of the following specialists for your cancer treatment.
Leah Cream, MD Leah Cream, MD Medical Oncologist View Researcher Profile
Jennifer Rosenberg, MD Jennifer Rosenberg, MD Radiation Oncologist View Researcher Profile
Marc Rovito, MD Marc Rovito, MD Hematology/Oncologist View Researcher Profile
Leonard Tuanquin, MD Leonard Tuanquin, MD Radiation Oncologist View Researcher Profile
Joshua Kesterson, MD Joshua Kesterson, MD View Researcher Profile
Rebecca Phaeton, MD Rebecca Phaeton, MD View Researcher Profile
Penn State Cancer Institute

Penn State Cancer Institute

400 University Dr
Hershey, PA 17033

Phone: 717-531-6585
Support groups offer an opportunity to connect with other patients, caregivers and families. Learn more about support groups offered at Penn State Cancer Institute.

Endometrial cancer cannot be prevented. However, there are some things you can do to lower your risk of developing endometrial cancer, including:

  • Maintain a healthy weight.
  • Stay physically active.
  • Talk to your doctor about if hormone replacement therapy is right for you.
  • See a doctor if you have any unusual or concerning symptoms.

Screening

There is no screening test for endometrial cancer. You should, however, see your doctor for an annual physical. That appointment may also include a pelvic exam. This yearly appointment gives you the opportunity to discuss any questions you have, and gives your doctor the chance to identify any potential health issues.

Endometrial cancer begins in the lining of the uterus.

Symptoms

Symptoms of endometrial cancer include:

  • Unusual vaginal bleeding or discharge
  • Pelvic or stomach pain
  • Weight loss

If you have any of these symptoms or any other concerns about your health, then you should schedule an appointment with your provider as soon as possible.

Diagnosis

During your appointment, your doctor will do a complete exam, including asking about your personal and family medical history. You will also have a physical and pelvic exam, which will help your doctor identify any unusual symptoms or signs that you may have endometrial cancer.

If your doctor finds anything unusual, you may be referred to a specialist for additional testing, including:

  • An ultrasound to get a clearer picture of your uterus and endometrial lining 
  • A biopsy to check for cancerous cells in endometrial lining

Test results from these exams will help your doctor create a treatment plan that is right for you and your specific cancer.